T a x L i b r a r y . U S

5 1 6 - 9 3 8 - 5 0 0 7
Nationwide Assistance                       
Bookmark and Share

WallachInc@gmail.com

The "Tax Resolution Services" of

Lance Wallach

The Leading Authority on 412i /
"
419 Plans"
and IRS "Tax Shelter" Issues
When you have  problems with the IRS, you need a proven winner to stand up to the IRS to help you avoid large"IRS penalties and interest" that could put you out of business.

If you are suffering from "tax problems" regarding "welfare benefit plan audits" and need 412i and "419 plan help", assistance with captive insurance, Section 79 plans, listed or reportable transactions, or IRC 6707A, you need
Lance Wallach's
"expert witness testimony" on your side. 
Lance Wallach's side has NEVER lost a case
.



For more information, visit
www.taxaudit419.com


Click on the link below to view the
Video Interview of Lance Wallach by the AIPCA
on
"419 Plans" and "Listed Transactions"


Click HERE to read where "INVESTMENT NEWS" magazine has even quoted Lance!


Professional Services:  "

  • "Audit help" and support
  • "Expert witness testimony"
  •  Plan reviews and evaluations
  •  Research and analysis of tax laws
  •  419e and 412i plan rescue (compliance consulting)
  •  Providing guidance for attorneys, CPAs and taxpayers nationwide
  •  Determination letters (tax exempt status)
  •  Most services can be handled through written and electronic communication


Mr. Wallach's Published Expertise:

  • "Tax reduction strategies"
  •  IRS crackdowns on 419 and 412(i) plans
  •  Reducing health care costs
  •  Updating retirement plans
  •  Asset protection
  •  Estate planning
  •  Premium financing
  •  Life settlements
  •  Captive insurance companies
  •  Bringing your plans into compliance with the new IRS regulations
Retirement Plans Alert!

Due to recent changes to IRS regulations, most "419 plans" and "412i plans" are now in violation of the tax laws, and could subject both participants and their "material advisors" to large "IRS tax penalties! The IRS is auditing many of these benefit plans now, and Section 79 plans, listed and reportable transactions and captive insurance are causing problems too. Let Lance Wallach review your plans BEFORE you get fined.

Avoid "IRS interest and penalties". Contact us for preventive advice today before it's too late!
Click on the links below to view two of Lance's many helpful articles..



IRS Hiring Agents in Abusive Transactions Group

  FAST PITCH NETWORKING

  Posted: Dec. 10

  By Lance Wallach

Here it is. Here is your proof of my predictions. Perhaps you didn’t believe me when I told you the IRS was coming after what it has deemed “abusive transactions,” but here it is, right from the IRS’s own job posting. If you were involved with a 419e, 412i, listed transaction, abusive tax shelter, Section 79, or captive, and you haven’t yet approached an expert for help with your situation, you had better do it now, before the notices start piling up on your desk.

A portion of the exact announcement from the Department of the Treasury:

Job Title: INTERNAL REVENUE AGENT (ABUSIVE TRANSACTIONS GROUP)

Agency: Internal Revenue Service

Open Period: Monday, October 18, 2010 to Monday, November 01, 2010

Sub Agency: Internal Revenue Service

Job Announcement Number: 11PH1-SBB0058-0512-12/13

Who May Be Considered:

·        IRS employees on Career or Career Conditional Appointments in the competitive service

·        Treasury Office of Chief Counsel employees on Career or Career Conditional Appointments or with prior competitive status

·        IRS employees on Term Appointments with potential conversion to a Career or Career Conditional Appointment in the same line of work

According to the job description, the agents of the Abusive Transactions Group will be conducting examinations of individuals, sole proprietorships, small corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries. They will be examining tax returns and will “determine the correct tax liability, and identify situations with potential for understated taxes.”

These agents will work in the Small Business/Self Employed Business Division (SB/SE) which provides examinations for about 7 million small businesses and upwards of 33 million self-employed and supplemental income taxpayers. This group specifically goes after taxpayers who generally have higher incomes than most taxpayers, need to file more tax forms, and generally need to rely more on paid tax preparers.” Their examinations can contain “special audit features or anticipated accounting, tax law, or investigative issues,” and look to make sure that, for example, specialty returns are filed properly.

The fines are severe. Under IRC 6707A, fines are up to $200,000 annually for not properly disclosing participation in a listed transaction. There was a moratorium on those fines until June 2010, pending new legislation to reduce them, but the new law virtually guarantees you will be fined. The fines had been $200,000 per year on the corporate level and $100,000 per year on the personal level. You got the fine even if you made no contributions for the year. All you had to do was to be in the plan and fail to properly disclose your participation.

You can possibly still avoid all this by properly filing form 8886 IMMEDIATELY with the IRS. Time is especially of the essence now. You MUST file before you are assessed the penalty. For months the Service has been holding off on actually collecting from people that they assessed because they did not know what Congress was going to do. But now they do know, so they are going to move aggressively to collection with people they have already assessed. There is no reason not to now. This is especially true because the new legislation still does not provide for a right of appeal or judicial review. The Service is still judge, jury, and executioner. Its word is absolute as far as determining what is a listed transaction.

So you have to file form 8886 fast, but you also have to file it properly. The Service treats forms that are incorrectly filed as if they were never filed. You get fined for filing incorrectly, or for not filing at all. The Statute of Limitations does not begin unless you properly file. That means IRS can come back to get you any time in the future unless you file properly.

If you don’t want these new IRS Agents, or any other IRS agents for that matter, to be earning their paychecks by coming after you, make sure you have done all you can to ensure that you have filed properly by reaching out for expert help today.

Lance Wallach, National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year and member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals, is a frequent speaker on retirement plans, financial and estate planning, and abusive tax shelters. He writes about 412(i), 419, and captive insurance plans. He gives expert witness testimony and his side has never lost a case. Contact him at 516.938.5007, wallachinc@gmail.com or visit www.taxadvisorexperts.org or www.taxaudit419.com.

The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any other type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice

 

 

 

 


Breaking News: Don't Become A Material 
Advisor

Accountants, insurance professionals and others need to be careful that they 
don’t become what the IRS calls 
material advisors.  If they sell or give advice, 
or sign tax returns for abusive, listed or similar plans; they risk a minimum 
$100,000 fine. Their client will then probably sue them after having dealt with 
the IRS.  

In 2010, the IRS raided the offices of 
Benistar in Simsbury, Conn., and seized 
the retirement benefit plan administration firm’s files and records. In 
McGehee Family Clinic, the Tax Court ruled that a clinic and shareholder’s 
investment in an employee benefit plan marketed under the name “Benistar” 
was a listed transaction because it was substantially similar to the 
transaction described in Notice 95-34 (1995-1 C.B. 309). This is at least the 
second case in which the court has ruled against the Benistar welfare benefit 
plan, by denominating it a 
listed transaction.

The McGehee Family Clinic enrolled in the Benistar Plan in May 2001 and 
claimed deductions for contributions to it in 2002 and 2005. The returns did 
not include a
 Form 8886, Reportable Transaction Disclosure Statement, or 
similar disclosure. The IRS disallowed the latter deduction and adjusted the 
2004 return of shareholder Robert Prosser and his wife to include the 
$50,000 payment to the plan.  
Click here to read more.

Lance Wallach Newsletter July 2011

419, 412i, Captive Insurance and section 79 plans continue to get large IRS fines. 

By Lance Wallach

Life insurance agents recently have started pushing the newest variety of high ticket items. After the IRS has almost put 419 plans out of business and severely curtailed abusive 412i plans they needed another way to sell large commission life insurance policies. Many of the promoters of the 419 and 412i plans are now promoting section 79 and captive insurance plans. They claim that these plans allow businesses to tax deduct life insurance. These promoters as in the past claim, that most of the benefits would be for the business owners. I have been an expert witness in many cases against these abusive plans and my side has never lost a case.

Recently my office has been receiving over fifty calls per month from people that are being threatened with large IRS fines. Most of these people (including CPAs) do not understand why this is happening. These fines are primarily the result of greed. Insurance company, insurance agent, plan promoter and even IRS greed. Insurance companies are always looking for ways to sell large amounts of life insurance. Taxpayers are constantly looking for larger tax deductions. Insurance agents want to earn large life insurance commissions. The IRS has started additional enforcement action against taxpayers and accountants.Read more here

Our tax resolution offices have received calls regarding the following companies or plans: CJA, CJA and Associates


 
Contact Lance Wallach for a personal and confidential FREE 5 minute telephone consultation.

Contact Lance Wallach and his team of experienced
insurance, legal and accounting professionals for all of your"tax problem solutions.

Call our National Offices:
Tel:  (516) 938-5007
Fax: (516) 938-6330

68 Keswick Lane

Plainview, New York  11803

 Email address:

WallachInc@gmail.com




The Lance Wallach Radio Show


(Click Above to view!)



Lance's Published Books:

Protecting Clients from Fraud, Incompetence, and Scams

The CPA's Guide to Life Insurance by BISK CPEasy

Active Search Results

IRS Audits 419, 412i, Captive Insurance Plans With Life Insurance, and Section 79 Scams

 

 

By Lance Wallach

 

The IRS started auditing 419 plans in the ‘90s, and then continued going after 412i and other plans that they considered abusive, listed, or reportable transactions, or substantially similar to such transactions.

 

In a recent Tax Court Case, Curcio v. Commissioner (TC Memo 2010-115), the Tax Court ruled that an investment in an employee welfare benefit plan marketed under the name “Benistar” was a listed transaction in that the transaction in question was substantially similar to the transaction described in IRS Notice 95-34. A subsequent case, McGehee Family Clinic, largely followed Curcio, though it was technically decided on other grounds. The parties stipulated to be bound by Curcio on the issue of whether the amounts paid by McGehee in connection with the Benistar 419 Plan and Trust were deductible. Curcio did not appear to have been decided yet at the time McGehee was argued. The McGehee opinion (Case No. 10-102) (United States Tax Court, September 15, 2010) does contain an exhaustive analysis and discussion of virtually all of the relevant issues.  Click here to read more.

Breaking News: Don't Become A Material 
Advisor

Accountants, insurance professionals and others need to be careful that they 
don’t become what the IRS calls 
material advisors.  If they sell or give advice, 
or sign tax returns for abusive, listed or similar plans; they risk a minimum 
$100,000 fine. Their client will then probably sue them after having dealt with 
the IRS.  

In 2010, the IRS raided the offices of 
Benistar in Simsbury, Conn., and seized 
the retirement benefit plan administration firm’s files and records. In 
McGehee Family Clinic, the Tax Court ruled that a clinic and shareholder’s 
investment in an employee benefit plan marketed under the name “Benistar” 
was a listed transaction because it was substantially similar to the 
transaction described in Notice 95-34 (1995-1 C.B. 309). This is at least the 
second case in which the court has ruled against the Benistar welfare benefit 
plan, by denominating it a 
listed transaction.

The McGehee Family Clinic enrolled in the Benistar Plan in May 2001 and 
claimed deductions for contributions to it in 2002 and 2005. The returns did 
not include a
 Form 8886, Reportable Transaction Disclosure Statement, or 
similar disclosure. The IRS disallowed the latter deduction and adjusted the 
2004 return of shareholder Robert Prosser and his wife to include the 
$50,000 payment to the plan.  
Click here to read more.


Offshore International Today                                 Aug 2011

FBAR Offshore Bank Accounts and Foreign Income Attacked by IRS

By: Lance Wallach

You may want to think about participation in the IRS’ offshore tax amnesty program (called the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Initiative). Do you want to play audit roulette with the IRS?  Some clients think they are too small to be prosecuted. They are wrong.

To the average businessperson, only the guys with tens of millions secretly stashed in Swiss bank accounts get prosecuted. Don't tell that to Michael Schiavo. He was just prosecuted for hiding money in a Swiss account back in 2003. How much money does the IRS say he hid? A whopping $90,000. That’s it.

But wait, there is more to the story. Schiavo attempted to do a quiet disclosure during the 2009 amnesty but instead of filling out the amnesty paperwork, he simply trusted that by coming forward voluntarily he could avoid criminal prosecution. He was wrong on all counts. Nothing is too small for the IRS, and nothing is too old.

“So, to save a whopping $40,624 in taxes, this guy risked a felony conviction and prison time, not to mention steep penalties that could very easily eat up the entire $90,000, and also his criminal and civil defense costs.

 The smart taxpayers are the ones coming forward and not having to look over their shoulders for the next 10 years.

Time is running out. The tax amnesty runs through August but it takes at least days to jump through all the hoops. We will also fight hard to reduce the penalties down even more. Remember, the IRS can go as low as 5%. Don’t want this to happen to you? Visit www.taxadvisorexpert.com today!

Lance Wallach, the National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year, speaks and writes extensively about retirement plans, Circular 230 problems and tax reduction strategies. He speaks at more than 40 conventions annually, writes for over 50 publications, is quoted regularly in the press, and has written numerous best-selling AICPA books, including Avoiding Circular 230 Malpractice Traps and Common Abusive Business Hot Spots. Contact him at 516.938.5007 or visit www.vebaplan.com.  

The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any other type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice.

                                                                              

 


Should you File, and then Opt Out?


 

Announced February 8, 2011, the IRS 2011 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Initiative (OVDI) program is a welcome but conditional amnesty allowing taxpayers with foreign accounts to come clean and get into compliance with the IRS.  The program runs through Sept.  9, 2011.

 

There’s been discussion of “opting out” of the program to take your chances in audit, but it’s a topic fraught with danger.  Now, however, there is guidance about opting out of the program that makes much of it transparent. Because of this late date it is recommended that you properly file FBARs and the 90-day request for amnesty extension. This is the first important step. If the forms are not done properly, you will have extensive problems and will not have to think about opting out. If your forms are properly done and filed, then your situation should be discussed with someone who is experienced in these matters.

 

Under the OVDI, taxpayers are subject to a penalty of 25 percent of the highest aggregate account balance on their undisclosed account(s) between 2003 and 2010.  If the value was less than $75,000 at all times during those years, the penalty is only 12.5 percent.

These account balance penalties are in lieu of all other penalties that may apply, including FBAR and offshore-related information return penalties.  Plus, participants are required to pay taxes and interest on any monies (such as interest income on foreign accounts) they previously failed to report.  Finally, they must pay an accuracy-related penalty equal to 20 percent of the underpayment of tax, plus interest.

Opting out of the program can make sense for some, though it involves taking your chances with an IRS examination. Someone should represent you with extensive experience in this. We always suggest they should at least be a CPA with years of experience in international tax. It’s even better if you use one that was with the international tax division of the IRS for a number of years. The IRS has published a separate guide detailing the rules and procedures for opting out. 

Here are some of the rules: 

1.      IRS Summary.  The IRS employee who has been handling your case summarizes it, agreeing or disagreeing with your view of penalties, and listing how extensive an audit he or she recommends.

2.      Program Status Report.  Before you can opt out, the IRS sends a letter reporting on the status of your disclosure and what you still must submit.  If you’ve given enough data, the IRS will calculate what you would owe under the OVDI.  You should provide any missing items within 30 days.

3.      Taxpayer Submission.  Within 20 days, the taxpayer opts out in writing and makes a written case what penalties should apply and why. 

4.      Central Committee.  A Committee of IRS Managers reviews the summary and decides how extensive an audit to conduct.  The IRS says “the taxpayer is not to be punished (or rewarded) for opting out.”   The Committee also decides whether to assign your case for a normal civil audit or to assign it for a criminal exam. 

5.      Written Warning.  The IRS sends another letter explaining that opting out must be in writing and is irrevocable.  You have 20 days thereafter to opt out in writing.

6.      Interview?  Some audits will include taxpayer interviews.

Bottom Line?  The “opt out” procedure is helpful but still a bit daunting.  If you are considering it, make sure you get some solid advice from an experienced person who, in my opinion, should have worked for the IRS and is a CPA about the nature of your case. This is just one of the many options that should be discussed with your advisor. There are many other strategies that you may want to utilize. Your advisor should be aware of all your options, and should explain them. If not, consider engaging someone else. Remember, the penalties can be very large, especially if your advisor is not skilled at this. There is even the potential for criminal prosecution.  See taxadvisorexpert.com for the latest information in this area or to contact one of our professionals today.

 

Lance Wallach, National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year and member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals, is a frequent speaker on retirement plans, abusive tax shelters, international tax, and other subjects. He writes about FBAR, OVDI, international taxation, captive insurance plans and other topics. He speaks at more than ten conventions annually, writes for more than 50 publications, is quoted regularly in the press and has been featured on television and radio financial talk shows including NBC, National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered” and others. Lance has written numerous books including “Protecting Clients from Fraud, Incompetence and Scams,” published by John Wiley and Sons, Bisk Education’s “CPA’s Guide to Life Insurance and Federal Estate and Gift Taxation,” as well as the AICPA best-selling books, including “Avoiding Circular 230 Malpractice Traps” and “Common Abusive Small Business Hot Spots.” He does expert witness testimony and has never lost a case. Contact him at 516.938.5007, lawallach@aol.com,lanwalla@aol.com or visit www.taxadvisorexpert.com.

 

The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice.

New IRS Fresh Start Initiative Helps Taxpayers                                 Who Owe Taxes

                       

Lance Wallach

March 12, 2012

The Internal Revenue Service has expanded its "Fresh Start" initiative to help struggling taxpayers who owe taxes. The following four tips explain the expanded relief for taxpayers.

Offer in Compromise Under the first round of Fresh Start in 2011, the IRS expanded the Offer in Compromise (OIC) program to cover a larger group of struggling taxpayers. An Offer in Compromise is an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that settles the taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed.

The IRS recognizes many taxpayers are still struggling to pay their bills so the agency has been working on more common-sense changes to the OIC program to more closely reflect real-world situations.

Generally, an offer will not be accepted if the IRS believes that the liability can be paid in full as a lump sum or through a payment agreement. The IRS looks at the taxpayer’s income and assets to make a determination regarding the taxpayer’s ability to pay.

Lance Wallach, National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year and member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals, is a frequent speaker on retirement plans, abusive tax shelters, , and others. Lance has written numerous books including Protecting Clients financial, international tax, and estate planning.  He writes about 412(i), 419, Section79, FBAR, and captive insurance plans. He speaks at more than ten conventions annually, writes for over fifty publications, is quoted regularly in the press and has been featured on television and radio financial talk shows including NBC, National Public Radio’s All Things Consideredfrom Fraud, Incompetence and Scams published by John Wiley and Sons, Bisk Education’s CPA’s Guide to Life Insurance and Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, as well as the AICPA best-selling books, including Avoiding Circular 230 Malpractice Traps and Common Abusive Small Business Hot Spots. He does expert witness testimony and has never lost a case. Contact him at 516.938.5007, wallachinc@gmail.com or visit www.taxadvisorexpert.com.

The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice.

About Lance Wallach:

Member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals

AICPA Author and Instructor

The leading expert and consultant on employee benefit plans (VEBA, 419e, 412i, 501c); life insurance, estates, trusts and pensions.

National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year.


Writes for over 50 national publications
.


Over 30 years professional experience


Managing Director of Veba Plan LLC

Invited speaker at more than 70 conventions each year, including the annual national conventions of the American Association of Attorney Certified Public Accountants, National Society of Accountants, National Network of Estate Planning Attorneys, National Association of Tax Practitioners, National Association of Enrolled Agents, National Association of Health Underwriters, American Society of Pension Actuaries, Employee Benefits Expo, Health Insurance Underwriters, NAPFA, NAIFA, FPA, NABA, ALPFA, various state CPA societies, Tax Institutes, as well as medical and insurance conventions, before CLU Societies, CPA/Law Forums throughout the United States, and Estate Planning conventions.

Education:
· Baruch College (CUNY), Baruch College     Graduate School
· The American College – Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC)
·
The American College – Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU)

Guest Lecturer for:

· Baruch College (Taxes on Tuesdays); Long Island University, C.W. Post Graduate School of Accountancy.

Lance Wallach, Managing Director, is the nation's leading expert on employee benefit plans, tax problem resolution and IRS audit defense.  Mr. Wallach's team of highly experienced tax attorneys, CPAs and ex-IRS agents have helped his clients save hundreds of thousands of dollars by successfully helping them in lawsuits and IRS audits. Lance Wallach, a member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals and an AICPA course developer, is a frequent and popular speaker on retirement plans, financial and estate planning, reducing health insurance costs, and tax oriented strategies at accounting and financial planning conventions. He has authored numerous books, including The Team Approach to Tax, Financial and Estate Planning by the AICPA and Wealth Preservation Planning by the National Society of Accountants. His newest books are CPA’s Guide to Life Insurance and CPA’s Guide to Federal and Estate Gift Taxation, published by Bisk CPEasy, and Protecting Clients from Fraud, Incompetence and Scams, published by  John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated. Mr. Wallach writes for more than 30 publications, including AICPA Planner, Accounting Today, CPA Journal, Enrolled Agents Journal, Financial Planning, Registered Representative, Tax Practitioners Journal, CPA/Law Forum, Employee Benefit News, Health Underwriter, Advisor and the American Medical Association News. Mr. Wallach is listed in Who’s Who in Finance and Industry and has been featured on television and radio financial talk shows.

Associates throughout the United States


Get Sued

June 2011

The IRS is cracking down on what it considers to be abusive tax shelters. Many of them are being marketed to small business owners by insurance professionals, financial planners and even accountants and attorneys. I speak at numerous conventions, for both business owners and accountants. And after I speak, I am always approached by many people who have questions about tax reduction plans that they have heard about. Below are the most common 419 tax reduction insurance plans. 

These come in various versions, and most of them have or will get the participant audited and the salesman sued. They purportedly allow the business owner to make a large tax-deductible contribution, and some or all of the contribution pays for a life insurance product. The IRS has been disallowing most versions of these plans for years, yet they continue to be sold. After everyone gets into trouble and the insurance agents get sued, the promoters of the abusive versions sometimes change the name of their company and call the plan something else. The insurance companies whose policies are sold are legitimate companies. What usually is not legitimate is the way that most of the plans are operated. There can also be a $200,000 IRS fine facing the insurance agent who sold the plan if Form 8918 has not been properly filed. I've reviewed hundreds of these forms for agents and have yet to see one that was filled out correctly. 

 

When the IRS audits a participant in one of these plans, the tax deductions are lost. There is also the interest and large penalties to consider. The business owner can also be facing a $200,000-a-year fine if he did not properly file Form 8886. Most of these forms have been filled out improperly. In my talks with the IRS, I was told that the IRS considers not filling out Form 8886 properly almost the same as not filing at all. 

412(i) retirement plans 

The IRS has been auditing participants in these types of retirement plans. While there is generally nothing wrong with many of the newer plans, the IRS considered most of the older abusive plans. Forms 8918 and 8886 are also required for abusive 412(i) plans. 

I have been an expert witness in a lot of these 419 and 412(i) lawsuits and I have not lost one of them. If you sold one or more of these plans, get someone who really knows what they are doing to help you immediately. Many advisors will take your money and claim to be able to help you. Make sure they have experience helping agents that have sold these types of plans. Don't let them learn on the job, with your career and money at stake.

 

Do not wait for IRS to come and get you, or for your client to sue you. Time is of the essence. Most insurance professionals need help to correct their improperly completed Form 8918 or to fill it out properly in the first place. If you have not previously filled out the form it is late, and therefore you should immediately seek assistance. There are plenty of legitimate tax reduction insurance plans out there. Just make sure that you know the history of the people with whom you conduct business. 

Remember, if something looks too good to be true, it usually is. Be careful. 


Lance Wallach, the National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year, speaks and writes extensively about retirement plans, Circular 230 problems and tax reduction strategies. He speaks at more than 40 conventions annually, writes for over 50 publications, is quoted regularly in the press, and has written numerous best-selling AICPA books, including Avoiding Circular 230 Malpractice Traps and Common Abusive Business Hot Spots. Contact him at 516.938.5007 or visit www.vebaplan.com.

The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any other type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice.


The Team Approach to Tax, Financial and Estate Planning.

 

by Lance Wallach

 

 

CPAs are the best and most qualified professionals when it comes to serving their clients needs, but they need to know when and how to coordinate with other experts.

 

Over the last twenty years we have worked with thousands of practitioners who have decided to add financial services to their practices. They do it for a variety of reasons, but the most common are as follows:

 

 

*They don’t want to refer their client elsewhere when they request financial services.

 

* They want to remain competitive.

 

*They want to diversify and increase their revenue as opposed to depending solely on tax and accounting revenue.


Click here to read full article.





IRS Audits 419, 412i, Captive Insurance Plans With Life Insurance, and Section 79 Scams

By Lance Wallach                  June 2011                                                                                     

The IRS started auditing 419 plans in the ‘90s, and then continued going after 412i and other plans that they considered abusive, listed, or reportable transactions, or substantially similar to such transactions.

 

In a recent Tax Court Case, Curcio v. Commissioner (TC Memo 2010-115), the Tax Court ruled that an investment in an employee welfare benefit plan marketed under the name “Benistar” was a listed transaction in that the transaction in question was substantially similar to the transaction described in IRS Notice 95-34. A subsequent case, McGehee Family Clinic, largely followed Curcio, though it was technically decided on other grounds. The parties stipulated to be bound by Curcio on the issue of whether the amounts paid by McGehee in connection with the Benistar 419 Plan and Trust were deductible. Curcio did not appear to have been decided yet at the time McGehee was argued. The McGehee opinion (Case No. 10-102) (United States Tax Court, September 15, 2010) does contain an exhaustive analysis and discussion of virtually all of the relevant issues.

 

Taxpayers and their representatives should be aware that the Service has disallowed deductions for contributions to these arrangements. The IRS is cracking down on small business owners who participate in tax reduction insurance plans and the brokers who sold them. Some of these plans include defined benefit retirement plans, IRAs, or even 401(k) plans with life insurance.

 

In order to fully grasp the severity of the situation, one must have an understanding of Notice 95-34, which was issued in response to trust arrangements sold to companies that were designed to provide deductible benefits such as life insurance, disability and severance pay benefits. The promoters of these arrangements claimed that all employer contributions were tax-deductible when paid, by relying on the 10-or-more-employer exemption from the IRC § 419 limits. It was claimed that permissible tax deductions were unlimited in amount.

 

In general, contributions to a welfare benefit fund are not fully deductible when paid. Sections 419 and 419A impose strict limits on the amount of tax-deductible prefunding permitted for contributions to a welfare benefit fund. Section 419A(F)(6) provides an exemption from Section 419 and Section 419A for certain “10-or-more employers” welfare benefit funds. In general, for this exemption to apply, the fund must have more than one contributing employer, of which no single employer can contribute more than 10% of the total contributions, and the plan must not be experience-rated with respect to individual employers.

 

According to the Notice, these arrangements typically involve an investment in variable life or universal life insurance contracts on the lives of the covered employees. The problem is that the employer contributions are large relative to the cost of the amount of term insurance that would be required to provide the death benefits under the arrangement, and the trust administrator may obtain cash to pay benefits other than death benefits, by such means as cashing in or withdrawing the cash value of the insurance policies. The plans are also often designed so that a particular employer’s contributions or its employees’ benefits may be determined in a way that insulates the employer to a significant extent from the experience of other subscribing employers. In general, the contributions and claimed tax deductions tend to be disproportionate to the economic realities of the arrangements.

 

Benistar advertised that enrollees should expect to obtain the same type of tax benefits as listed in the transaction described in Notice 95-34. The benefits of enrollment listed in its advertising packet included: 

  • Virtually unlimited deductions for the employer;
  • Contributions could vary from year to year;
  • Benefits could be provided to one or more key executives on a selective basis;
  • No need to provide benefits to rank-and-file employees;
  • Contributions to the plan were not limited by qualified plan rules and would not interfere with pension, profit sharing or 401(k) plans;
  • Funds inside the plan would accumulate tax-free;
  • Beneficiaries could receive death proceeds free of both income tax and estate tax;
  • The program could be arranged for tax-free distribution at a later date;
  • Funds in the plan were secure from the hands of creditors.

The Court said that the Benistar Plan was factually similar to the plans described in Notice 95-34 at all relevant times. In rendering its decision the court heavily cited Curcio, in which the court also ruled in favor of the IRS. As noted in Curcio, the insurance policies, overwhelmingly variable or universal life policies, required large contributions relative to the cost of the amount of term insurance that would be required to provide the death benefits under the arrangement. The Benistar Plan owned the insurance contracts.

 

Following Curcio, as the Court has stipulated, the Court held that the contributions to Benistar were not deductible under section 162(a) because participants could receive the value reflected in the underlying insurance policies purchased by Benistar—despite the payment of benefits by Benistar seeming to be contingent upon an unanticipated event (the death of the insured while employed). As long as plan participants were willing to abide by Benistar’s distribution policies, there was no reason ever to forfeit a policy to the plan. In fact, in estimating life insurance rates, the taxpayers’ expert in Curcio assumed that there would be no forfeitures, even though he admitted that an insurance company would generally assume a reasonable rate of policy lapses.

 

The McGehee Family Clinic had enrolled in the Benistar Plan in May 2001 and claimed deductions for contributions to it in 2002 and 2005. The returns did not include a Form 8886,Reportable Transaction Disclosure Statement, or similar disclosure.

 

The IRS disallowed the latter deduction and adjusted the 2004 return of shareholder Robert Prosser and his wife to include the $50,000 payment to the plan. The IRS also assessed tax deficiencies and the enhanced 30% penalty totaling almost $21,000 against the clinic and $21,000 against the Prossers. The court ruled that the Prossers failed to prove a reasonable cause or good faith exception.

 

 

More you should know:

 

  • In recent years, some section 412(i) plans have been funded with life insurance using face amounts in excess of the maximum death benefit a qualified plan is permitted to pay.  Ideally, the plan should limit the proceeds that can be paid as a death benefit in the event of a participant’s death.  Excess amounts would revert to the plan.  Effective February 13, 2004, the purchase of excessive life insurance in any plan is considered a listed transaction if the face amount of the insurance exceeds the amount that can be issued by $100,000 or more and the employer has deducted the premiums for the insurance.
  • A 412(i) plan in and of itself is not a listed transaction; however, the IRS has a task force auditing 412i plans.
  • An employer has not engaged in a listed transaction simply because it is a 412(i) plan.
  • Just because a 412(i) plan was audited and sanctioned for certain items, does not necessarily mean the plan engaged in a listed transaction. Some 412(i) plans have been audited and sanctioned for issues not related to listed transactions.

 

 

Companies should carefully evaluate proposed investments in plans such as the Benistar Plan. The claimed deductions will not be available, and penalties will be assessed for lack of disclosure if the investment is similar to the investments described in Notice 95-34. In addition, under IRC 6707A, IRS fines participants a large amount of money for not properly disclosing their participation in listed, reportable or similar transactions; an issue that was not before the Tax Court in either Curcio or McGehee. The disclosure needs to be made for every year the participant is in a plan. The forms need to be properly filed even for years that no contributions are made. I have received numerous calls from participants who did disclose and still got fined because the forms were not filled in properly. A plan administrator told me that he assisted hundreds of his participants file forms, and they still all received very large IRS fines for not properly filling in the forms.

 

IRS has been attacking all 419 welfare benefit plans, many 412i retirement plans, captive insurance plans with life insurance in them and Section 79 plans.

 

 Lance Wallach, National Society of Accountants Speaker of the Year and member of the AICPA faculty of teaching professionals, is a frequent speaker on retirement plans, abusive tax shelters, financial, international tax, and estate planning.  He writes about 412(i), 419, Section79, FBAR, and captive insurance plans. He speaks at more than ten conventions annually, writes for over fifty publications, is quoted regularly in the press and has been featured on television and radio financial talk shows including NBC, National Pubic Radio’s All Things Considered, and others. Lance has written numerous books including Protecting Clients from Fraud, Incompetence and Scams published by John Wiley and Sons, Bisk Education’s CPA’s Guide to Life Insurance and Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, as well as the AICPA best-selling books, including Avoiding Circular 230 Malpractice Traps and Common Abusive Small Business Hot Spots. He does expert witness testimony and has never lost a case. Contact him at 516.938.5007, lawallach@aol.com or visit www.vebaplan.com.

 

Lance Wallach
68 Keswick Lane
Plainview, NY 11803
Ph.: (516)938-5007
Fax: (516)938-6330
www.vebaplan.com

National Society of Accountants Speaker of The Year



The information provided herein is not intended as legal, accounting, financial or any type of advice for any specific individual or other entity. You should contact an appropriate professional for any such advice.